A Study of the Syntactic Language Skills of Normal School-Age Children The purpose of this study was to examine the syntactic language skills of school-age children. Subjects were chosen from the sixth and ninth grades and asked to create a narrative on a topic of their choice. Narratives were analyzed descriptively for differences in syntax using an adaptation of the Language ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1985
A Study of the Syntactic Language Skills of Normal School-Age Children
 
Author Notes
  • Joan S. Klecan-Aker is affiliated with the Department of Communication, University of Houston-University Park, Houston, TX 77004. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Dona Lea Hedrick is affiliated with the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Central Florida, Box 25,000, Orlando, FL 32803.
    Joan S. Klecan-Aker is affiliated with the Department of Communication, University of Houston-University Park, Houston, TX 77004. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Dona Lea Hedrick is affiliated with the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Central Florida, Box 25,000, Orlando, FL 32803.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1985
A Study of the Syntactic Language Skills of Normal School-Age Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1985, Vol. 16, 187-198. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1603.187
History: Received June 27, 1983 , Accepted July 18, 1984
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1985, Vol. 16, 187-198. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1603.187
History: Received June 27, 1983; Accepted July 18, 1984

The purpose of this study was to examine the syntactic language skills of school-age children. Subjects were chosen from the sixth and ninth grades and asked to create a narrative on a topic of their choice. Narratives were analyzed descriptively for differences in syntax using an adaptation of the Language Assessment Remediation Screening Procedure. Narratives were analyzed statistically for differences in T-unit length, clause length, and clause usage. Findings indicated statistically significant differences between groups in the words per T-unit, and the words per clause used in the narratives. Differences were not found in the use of verb extensions between groups. Implications from these results are drawn relative to the evaluation and treatment of the language-disordered child.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access