Comparison of Three Phonological Analysis Procedures This study was undertaken to compare three procedures used in phonological process analysis: Natural Process Analysis (Shriberg & Kwiatkowski, 1980), The Assessment of Phonological Processes (Hodson, 1980) and Procedures for Phonological Analysis of Children's Language (Ingram, 1981). Questions that are likely to occur to the speech-language pathologist as a potential ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1985
Comparison of Three Phonological Analysis Procedures
 
Author Notes
  • Elaine Pagel Paden is an associate professor, in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois, 901 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL, 61820. Requests for reprints may be sent to this address. Susan Arnold Moss is a doctoral student in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois.
    Elaine Pagel Paden is an associate professor, in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois, 901 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL, 61820. Requests for reprints may be sent to this address. Susan Arnold Moss is a doctoral student in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1985
Comparison of Three Phonological Analysis Procedures
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1985, Vol. 16, 103-109. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1602.103
History: Received January 28, 1983 , Accepted September 6, 1983
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1985, Vol. 16, 103-109. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1602.103
History: Received January 28, 1983; Accepted September 6, 1983

This study was undertaken to compare three procedures used in phonological process analysis: Natural Process Analysis (Shriberg & Kwiatkowski, 1980), The Assessment of Phonological Processes (Hodson, 1980) and Procedures for Phonological Analysis of Children's Language (Ingram, 1981). Questions that are likely to occur to the speech-language pathologist as a potential user of these tests were investigated: (a) Does the type of speech sample alter results? (b) Do different analysis procedures identify different arrays of processes for a child? and (c) How much time is required for administration? Although only three subjects were evaluated the results suggest that any of the procedures would identify essentially the same phonological processes as remediation targets. Factors other than these results, therefore, may have greater influence on the user's selection of an analysis procedure.

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