Procedure for Maximizing Phonological Information from Single-Word Responses Formal articulation test responses are often used by the busy clinician as a basis for planning intervention goals. This article describes a 6-step procedure for using efficiently the single-word responses elicited with an articulation test. This procedure involves the assessment of all consonants within a word rather than only test-target ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1984
Procedure for Maximizing Phonological Information from Single-Word Responses
 
Author Notes
  • Harriet B. Klein, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology in the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences, New York University, 829 Shimkin Hall, Washington Square, New York, NY 10003. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address.
    Harriet B. Klein, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology in the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences, New York University, 829 Shimkin Hall, Washington Square, New York, NY 10003. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1984
Procedure for Maximizing Phonological Information from Single-Word Responses
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1984, Vol. 15, 267-274. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1504.267
History: Received February 14, 1983 , Accepted April 21, 1983
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1984, Vol. 15, 267-274. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1504.267
History: Received February 14, 1983; Accepted April 21, 1983

Formal articulation test responses are often used by the busy clinician as a basis for planning intervention goals. This article describes a 6-step procedure for using efficiently the single-word responses elicited with an articulation test. This procedure involves the assessment of all consonants within a word rather than only test-target consonants. Responses are organized within a Model and Replica chart to yield information about an individual's (a) articulation ability, (b) frequency of target attainment, substitutions, and deletions, (c) variability in production, and (d) phonological processes. This procedure is recommended as a preliminary assessment measure. It is advised that more detailed analysis of continuous speech be undertaken in conjunction with early treatment sessions.

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