Relative Amplitude and Time Characteristics of Denasalized /m/, /n/, and /ng/ Consonants This investigation studied the effects of two forms of rhinological disorders on the relative amplitude and time characteristics of the /m/, /n/, and // phonemes. Results showed that the temporal characteristics and performance variability associated with the production of the nasal sounds were within normal limits for the denasal subjects, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1984
Relative Amplitude and Time Characteristics of Denasalized /m/, /n/, and /ng/ Consonants
 
Author Notes
  • Michael P. Rastatter, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Programs in Communication Disorders, School of Speech Communication, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at the above address.
    Michael P. Rastatter, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Programs in Communication Disorders, School of Speech Communication, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at the above address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1984
Relative Amplitude and Time Characteristics of Denasalized /m/, /n/, and /ng/ Consonants
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1984, Vol. 15, 253-261. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1504.253
History: Received March 4, 1983 , Accepted July 22, 1983
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1984, Vol. 15, 253-261. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1504.253
History: Received March 4, 1983; Accepted July 22, 1983

This investigation studied the effects of two forms of rhinological disorders on the relative amplitude and time characteristics of the /m/, /n/, and // phonemes. Results showed that the temporal characteristics and performance variability associated with the production of the nasal sounds were within normal limits for the denasal subjects, whereas relative amplitude changes occurring across the V nasal V waveforms were significantly greater for the denasal speakers. These results suggest that true stop/nasal articulatory substitutions do not actually occur in the speech of denasal speakers. Clinical implications are discussed.

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