Problem Solving in Child Language Disorders The Clinician as Clinical Scientist Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1984
Problem Solving in Child Language Disorders
 
Author Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi, Ph.D., a Speech-Language Pathologist, is currently affiliated with the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Memphis State University, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.
    Alan G. Kamhi, Ph.D., a Speech-Language Pathologist, is currently affiliated with the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Memphis State University, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1984
Problem Solving in Child Language Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1984, Vol. 15, 226-234. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1504.226
History: Received August 23, 1982 , Accepted March 11, 1983
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1984, Vol. 15, 226-234. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1504.226
History: Received August 23, 1982; Accepted March 11, 1983

Some problems exist in the way in which children with language disorders are classified, diagnosed, and treated. To help resolve these problems, clinicians need to function as clinical scientists in the diagnostic and therapeutic process. The classification, diagnosis, and treatment of children with language disorders should reflect hypotheses about the different levels of cause-effect relationships that exist among the structures, processes, and behaviors involved in language. Specifically, hypotheses about the primary and secondary deficits that characterize language disorders need to be made. That is, symptoms that reflect the underlying deficit must be differentiated from symptoms that reflect secondary and compensatory deficits. Clinical examples are presented to illustrate the way in which classification, diagnosis, and treatment of language-disordered children would proceed using these notions.

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