Supplementing Language Therapy Working with the Classroom Teacher Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1984
Supplementing Language Therapy
 
Author Notes
  • Martin Fujiki and Bonnie Brinton are Assistant Professors with the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, School of Medical Sciences Mackay Science Building, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557. Requests for reprints may be sent there to Martin Fujiki.
    Martin Fujiki and Bonnie Brinton are Assistant Professors with the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, School of Medical Sciences Mackay Science Building, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557. Requests for reprints may be sent there to Martin Fujiki.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1984
Supplementing Language Therapy
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1984, Vol. 15, 98-109. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1502.98
History: Received June 2, 1982 , Accepted September 30, 1982
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1984, Vol. 15, 98-109. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1502.98
History: Received June 2, 1982; Accepted September 30, 1982

In order to provide the best treatment for the language-handicapped child, the school speech-language pathologist and the classroom teacher must work together as members of the educational team. While teachers often ask what they might do to help a child with a language disorder in the classroom, the nature of the setting makes this a particularly challenging task. This article provides specific ideas and activities that the speech-language pathologist might suggest to the classroom teacher in dealing with the language-handicapped child. Suggestions include ways of improving the linguistic interaction between teacher and child, as well as specific activities that may be used in the classroom to facilitate language learning.

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