The Diagnostic and Predictive Validity of The Renfrew Bus Story Purpose Two studies are presented providing evidence indicating the diagnostic and predictive validity of the American version of The Renfrew Bus Story (J. Cowley & C. Glasgow, 1994). Method Thirty-two children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 32 children with typical language development participated in the first study ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2007
The Diagnostic and Predictive Validity of The Renfrew Bus Story
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary E. Pankratz
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Elena Plante
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Rebecca Vance
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Deborah M. Insalaco
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Elena Plante, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0071. E-mail: eplante@u.arizona.edu.
  • Deborah M. Insalaco is now at Buffalo State College.
    Deborah M. Insalaco is now at Buffalo State College.×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2007
The Diagnostic and Predictive Validity of The Renfrew Bus Story
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2007, Vol. 38, 390-399. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/040)
History: Received June 28, 2006 , Revised November 28, 2006 , Accepted January 29, 2007
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2007, Vol. 38, 390-399. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/040)
History: Received June 28, 2006; Revised November 28, 2006; Accepted January 29, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 52

Purpose Two studies are presented providing evidence indicating the diagnostic and predictive validity of the American version of The Renfrew Bus Story (J. Cowley & C. Glasgow, 1994).

Method Thirty-two children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 32 children with typical language development participated in the first study to determine identification accuracy of The Renfrew Bus Story. A second study of 12 children with SLI participated in a 3-year longitudinal study that was used to gather evidence of the predictive validity of The Renfrew Bus Story.

Results The combined Information and Length scores of The Renfrew Bus Story yielded adequate (84%) sensitivity but weak (78%) specificity, making it an inappropriate tool for identifying children with language impairment or typical language development. Moderate to high correlations were found between The Renfrew Bus Story scores and nearly all scores from language tests administered 3 years later.

Implications The evidence supports the use of The Renfrew Bus Story as an indicator of future language performance for children with SLI. However, its performance as a measure for identifying impairments during the preschool years is somewhat weaker due to overidentification of typically developing children, and in particular minority children, as having poor narrative skills.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This research was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD Grant RO1 DC04726). We thank Mary Alt and Barbara Cone-Wesson for their critique of this manuscript.
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