Teachers' Perceptions of Students With Speech Sound Disorders: A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis Purpose This study examined 2nd-grade teachers' perceptions of the academic, social, and behavioral competence of students with speech sound disorders (SSDs). Method Forty-eight 2nd-grade teachers listened to 2 groups of sentences differing by intelligibility and pitch but spoken by a single 2nd grader. For each sentence group, teachers ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2007
Teachers' Perceptions of Students With Speech Sound Disorders: A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Megan Overby
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Thomas Carrell
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • John Bernthal
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Contact author: Megan S. Overby, 209 Lally, The College of St. Rose, 432 Western Avenue, Albany, NY 12203. E-mail: overbym@strose.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2007
Teachers' Perceptions of Students With Speech Sound Disorders: A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2007, Vol. 38, 327-341. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/035)
History: Received May 30, 2006 , Revised November 7, 2006 , Accepted January 12, 2007
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2007, Vol. 38, 327-341. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/035)
History: Received May 30, 2006; Revised November 7, 2006; Accepted January 12, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 15

Purpose This study examined 2nd-grade teachers' perceptions of the academic, social, and behavioral competence of students with speech sound disorders (SSDs).

Method Forty-eight 2nd-grade teachers listened to 2 groups of sentences differing by intelligibility and pitch but spoken by a single 2nd grader. For each sentence group, teachers rated the speaker’s academic, social, and behavioral competence using an adapted version of the Teacher Rating Scale of the Self-Perception Profile for Children (S. Harter, 1985) and completed 3 open-ended questions. The matched-guise design controlled for confounding speaker and stimuli variables that were inherent in prior studies.

Results Statistically significant differences in teachers' expectations of children’s academic, social, and behavioral performances were found between moderately intelligible and normal intelligibility speech. Teachers associated moderately intelligible low-pitched speech with more behavior problems than moderately intelligible high-pitched speech or either pitch with normal intelligibility. One third of the teachers reported that they could not accurately predict a child’s school performance based on the child’s speech skills, one third of the teachers causally related school difficulty to SSD, and one third of the teachers made no comment.

Conclusion Intelligibility and speaker pitch appear to be speech variables that influence teachers' perceptions of children’s school performance.

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