Phonological Processing Skills of Adolescents With Residual Speech Sound Errors Purpose Research has shown that young children with speech sound disorders may have weaknesses in phonological processing. However, such skills have not been thoroughly examined in adolescents with residual speech sound errors. Therefore, this study compared the phonological processing abilities of adolescents with residual speech sound errors to those of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2007
Phonological Processing Skills of Adolescents With Residual Speech Sound Errors
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan L. Preston
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
  • Mary Louise Edwards
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
  • Contact author: Jonathan Preston, Syracuse University, Communication Sciences and Disorders, 805 South Crouse Avenue, Syracuse, NY 13244. E-mail: jopresto@syr.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2007
Phonological Processing Skills of Adolescents With Residual Speech Sound Errors
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2007, Vol. 38, 297-308. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/032)
History: Received April 10, 2006 , Accepted December 11, 2006
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2007, Vol. 38, 297-308. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/032)
History: Received April 10, 2006; Accepted December 11, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 26

Purpose Research has shown that young children with speech sound disorders may have weaknesses in phonological processing. However, such skills have not been thoroughly examined in adolescents with residual speech sound errors. Therefore, this study compared the phonological processing abilities of adolescents with residual speech sound errors to those of normally speaking peers.

Method Two nonword repetition tasks, multisyllabic word repetition, spoonerisms, phoneme reversals, and an elision task were used to compare the phonological processing skills of 10–14-year-olds with residual speech sound errors that include rhotic phonemes (RE, n = 13) to those of normally speaking (NS, n = 14) adolescents of similar age and receptive vocabulary abilities.

Results The 2 groups were found to differ on 5 of the 6 phonological processing tasks. Discriminant analysis showed that 85% of the participants could be correctly classified into the RE and NS groups based solely on phonological processing skills.

Conclusion The possible nature of the phonological processing impairment is discussed in the context of current theoretical understanding. It is recommended that when planning assessment and intervention for adolescents with residual speech sound errors, clinicians be cognizant of the fact that the adolescents may also have weaknesses in phonological processing.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Special thanks to Lianjun Zhang for his statistical expertise and to Christine Dollaghan for providing the nonword repetition audio files. This research was completed in fulfillment of a predissertation research apprenticeship project through the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department and was partially supported by the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University.
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