Public School Voice Clinics, Part II Diagnosis and Recommendations— A 10-Year Review Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   January 01, 1984
Public School Voice Clinics, Part II
 
Author Notes
  • Sandra Q. Miller is a Speech and Language Clinician with the Spokane, Washington, Public Schools. Requests for reprints should be addressed to her at North 5021 Greenwood Avenue, Spokane, WA 99205. Charles L. Madison is Coordinator of Clinical Services, Communication Disorders Program, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington.
    Sandra Q. Miller is a Speech and Language Clinician with the Spokane, Washington, Public Schools. Requests for reprints should be addressed to her at North 5021 Greenwood Avenue, Spokane, WA 99205. Charles L. Madison is Coordinator of Clinical Services, Communication Disorders Program, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1984
Public School Voice Clinics, Part II
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1984, Vol. 15, 58-64. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1501.58
History: Received June 2, 1982 , Accepted July 21, 1982
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1984, Vol. 15, 58-64. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1501.58
History: Received June 2, 1982; Accepted July 21, 1982

In 10 years of semiannual voice clinics held in a metropolitan school district, 249 cases were reviewed. Attending otolaryngologists diagnosed vocal nodules in 40% of the cases. Chronic laryngitis and thickened cords were also frequently noted. One third of the cases had concomitant allergies, ear, and/or upper respiratory problems. Direct voice therapy was recommended for 65% of those attending voice clinics. The data on sex and age were consistent with previous research. Family voice history and prognosis are also discussed.

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