Effects of Selected Rhinologic Disorders on the Perception of Nasal Resonance in Children A group of sophisticated listeners judged the nasal resonance characteristics of normal children versus children evidencing selected rhinologic disorders under three speaking conditions. Results showed that perceptions of denasality are influenced by both speakers and speaking tasks. That is, children with allergic rhinitis and edemic adenoids were perceived as being ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1984
Effects of Selected Rhinologic Disorders on the Perception of Nasal Resonance in Children
 
Author Notes
  • Michael P. Rastatter, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor and Melvin Hyman, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Programs in Communication Disorders, School of Speech Communication, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403. Requests for reprints may be sent to Dr. Rastatter.
    Michael P. Rastatter, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor and Melvin Hyman, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Programs in Communication Disorders, School of Speech Communication, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403. Requests for reprints may be sent to Dr. Rastatter.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1984
Effects of Selected Rhinologic Disorders on the Perception of Nasal Resonance in Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1984, Vol. 15, 44-50. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1501.44
History: Received March 15, 1982 , Accepted August 13, 1982
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1984, Vol. 15, 44-50. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1501.44
History: Received March 15, 1982; Accepted August 13, 1982

A group of sophisticated listeners judged the nasal resonance characteristics of normal children versus children evidencing selected rhinologic disorders under three speaking conditions. Results showed that perceptions of denasality are influenced by both speakers and speaking tasks. That is, children with allergic rhinitis and edemic adenoids were perceived as being denasal when they produced VCV utterances and recited sentences. However, their resonance characteristics were deemed normal for vowel productions. Interestingly, children with severely deviated septums were judged to have normal nasal resonance under all speaking conditions. Clinical implications are discussed.

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