The Effect of Context on Language Learning by Severely Retarded Young Adults The rate of learning of semantically based utterances and the generalization of those utterances was measured for six severely mentally retarded students enrolled in a language-training program. The language-training program was implemented by the classroom teacher as part of the daily curriculum. Language training was conducted under two stimulus conditions: ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1983
The Effect of Context on Language Learning by Severely Retarded Young Adults
 
Author Notes
  • Bernard B. Spiegel, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61761, where requests for reprints should be sent.
    Bernard B. Spiegel, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61761, where requests for reprints should be sent.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1983
The Effect of Context on Language Learning by Severely Retarded Young Adults
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1983, Vol. 14, 252-259. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1404.252
History: Received January 20, 1982 , Accepted June 14, 1982
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1983, Vol. 14, 252-259. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1404.252
History: Received January 20, 1982; Accepted June 14, 1982

The rate of learning of semantically based utterances and the generalization of those utterances was measured for six severely mentally retarded students enrolled in a language-training program. The language-training program was implemented by the classroom teacher as part of the daily curriculum. Language training was conducted under two stimulus conditions: active participation by the student and teacher to provide stimulus context (AP) and pictorial representation of the utterance meaning (PR). The results indicated more rapid learning within the active participation condition. Generalization was found to be greater and more stable following learning within the active participation condition.

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