A Comparison of Categorization Skills of Normal and Language-Delayed Children in Early Elementary School This study compared the categorization skills of first-grade children representing three levels of expressive language development. Each group of 12 children (normal, mild-moderate delay, and severe delay) was tested on seven different categorization tasks. The results indicated a significant difference in categorization skills between the children with normal expressive language ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1983
A Comparison of Categorization Skills of Normal and Language-Delayed Children in Early Elementary School
 
Author Notes
  • Cynthia M. Partyka, M.A., is a Speech-Language Pathologist with the Illinois School, Park Forest, IL 60466. Janet D. Kresheck, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60015, where requests for reprints may be sent.
    Cynthia M. Partyka, M.A., is a Speech-Language Pathologist with the Illinois School, Park Forest, IL 60466. Janet D. Kresheck, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60015, where requests for reprints may be sent.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1983
A Comparison of Categorization Skills of Normal and Language-Delayed Children in Early Elementary School
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1983, Vol. 14, 243-251. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1404.243
History: Received July 6, 1981 , Accepted May 27, 1982
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1983, Vol. 14, 243-251. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1404.243
History: Received July 6, 1981; Accepted May 27, 1982

This study compared the categorization skills of first-grade children representing three levels of expressive language development. Each group of 12 children (normal, mild-moderate delay, and severe delay) was tested on seven different categorization tasks. The results indicated a significant difference in categorization skills between the children with normal expressive language development and each of the two expressive language-delayed groups. Differential results for the three language groups are discussed.

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