Language Behaviors of Mothers of Children with Normal and Delayed Language The language behavior of mothers of children with normally developing language was compared to that of mothers of children whose overall development appeared normal except for delayed expressive language. The two randomly selected groups of children from 2 to 5 years of age were matched in age within 6 months. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1983
Language Behaviors of Mothers of Children with Normal and Delayed Language
 
Author Notes
  • Judith Love Bondurant, Ed.D., is affiliated with the State University College at Buffalo, 204 Ketchum Hall, 1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, where requests for reprints should be sent. Dominic J. Romeo, Ed.D., and Richard Kretschmer, Ph.D., are both affiliated with the University of Cincinnati, Ohio.
    Judith Love Bondurant, Ed.D., is affiliated with the State University College at Buffalo, 204 Ketchum Hall, 1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, where requests for reprints should be sent. Dominic J. Romeo, Ed.D., and Richard Kretschmer, Ph.D., are both affiliated with the University of Cincinnati, Ohio.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1983
Language Behaviors of Mothers of Children with Normal and Delayed Language
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1983, Vol. 14, 233-242. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1404.233
History: Received January 18, 1982 , Accepted May 24, 1982
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1983, Vol. 14, 233-242. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1404.233
History: Received January 18, 1982; Accepted May 24, 1982

The language behavior of mothers of children with normally developing language was compared to that of mothers of children whose overall development appeared normal except for delayed expressive language. The two randomly selected groups of children from 2 to 5 years of age were matched in age within 6 months. The language of both groups of mothers, as they interacted with their children in a structured task situation and an unstructured free play situation, was recorded via audiotape, then transcribed and analyzed. Significant differences were found in the mean length of utterances, the number of questions and directions, and the number of acceptance and rejection utterances given by the mothers. Results suggest areas for further investigation leading to recommendations for parents and preschool programming prompting language development.

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