Improving Efficiency in Articulation Screening Three screening articulation tests were compared with regard to two factors that might influence preference for one test over another: (a) ease of stimulus picture identification, and (b) time required to administer each test. In addition, the degree of agreement between diagnostic decisions and clinical judgments concerning articulation proficiency/defectiveness was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1983
Improving Efficiency in Articulation Screening
 
Author Notes
  • Katharine F. Eveleigh is affiliated with Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta. Genese A. Warr-Leeper is affiliated with the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6G 1H1, Canada; requests for reprints should be sent to her there.
    Katharine F. Eveleigh is affiliated with Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta. Genese A. Warr-Leeper is affiliated with the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6G 1H1, Canada; requests for reprints should be sent to her there.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1983
Improving Efficiency in Articulation Screening
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1983, Vol. 14, 223-232. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1404.223
History: Received July 31, 1981 , Accepted May 24, 1982
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1983, Vol. 14, 223-232. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1404.223
History: Received July 31, 1981; Accepted May 24, 1982

Three screening articulation tests were compared with regard to two factors that might influence preference for one test over another: (a) ease of stimulus picture identification, and (b) time required to administer each test. In addition, the degree of agreement between diagnostic decisions and clinical judgments concerning articulation proficiency/defectiveness was determined. The screening version of the Photo Articulation Test (PAT) elicited significantly (p < .001) more correct initial picture identifications in a relatively short amount of time than either that of the Fisher-Logemann Test of Articulation Competence (F-L) or the Templin-Darley Test of Articulation (T-D). Significant relationships between diagnostic decisions and clinical judgments were obtained for both normal and articulation-defective children; however, stronger relationships were attained with the 4- and 5-year-old children than with the 3-year-olds. The clinical significance of such results for improving efficiency in articulation screening is discussed.

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