Metaphoric Understanding in Preadolescents Having a History of Language Acquisition Difficulties This study was designed to investigate metaphoric understanding and its relationship to a cognitive task of combinatorial reasoning in preadolescent children (x age =10:7) who were diagnosed as language impaired during their preschool years. Although the children performed as well as a group of normal preadolescents (x age =10:8) on ... Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   July 01, 1983
Metaphoric Understanding in Preadolescents Having a History of Language Acquisition Difficulties
 
Author Notes
  • Marilyn A. Nippold is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, where requests for reprints and additional information should be sent. Sandy H. Fey is affiliated with the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
    Marilyn A. Nippold is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, where requests for reprints and additional information should be sent. Sandy H. Fey is affiliated with the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1983
Metaphoric Understanding in Preadolescents Having a History of Language Acquisition Difficulties
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1983, Vol. 14, 171-180. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1403.171
History: Received November 16, 1981 , Accepted February 17, 1982
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1983, Vol. 14, 171-180. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1403.171
History: Received November 16, 1981; Accepted February 17, 1982

This study was designed to investigate metaphoric understanding and its relationship to a cognitive task of combinatorial reasoning in preadolescent children (x age =10:7) who were diagnosed as language impaired during their preschool years. Although the children performed as well as a group of normal preadolescents (x age =10:8) on certain tests involving literal aspects of language and on a nonverbal intelligence test, they were deficient in their understanding of metaphoric sentences and in performing the cognitive task. This result suggested that children who as preschoolers exhibit difficulty in acquiring language may at a later time have difficulty dealing with figurative aspects of language. Research implications are discussed.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access