Development of Lexical Comprehension in a Profoundly Deaf Child Using a Wearable, Vibrotactile Communication Aid A longitudinal study of a profoundly deaf young child learning oral language with the aid of a vibrotactile communication device was conducted for 10 months. Audio-and videotapes and written observational notes were collected on Tabitha from ages 33–43 months while she used the device. At 33 months, Tabitha produced limited ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1983
Development of Lexical Comprehension in a Profoundly Deaf Child Using a Wearable, Vibrotactile Communication Aid
 
Author Notes
  • Adele Proctor, Sc.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Boston-Bouve College of Human Development Professions, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Moise H. Goldstein, Jr., Sc.D., is a Professor in the Departments of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218.
    Adele Proctor, Sc.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Boston-Bouve College of Human Development Professions, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Moise H. Goldstein, Jr., Sc.D., is a Professor in the Departments of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1983
Development of Lexical Comprehension in a Profoundly Deaf Child Using a Wearable, Vibrotactile Communication Aid
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1983, Vol. 14, 138-149. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1403.138
History: Received July 22, 1981 , Accepted December 5, 1981
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1983, Vol. 14, 138-149. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1403.138
History: Received July 22, 1981; Accepted December 5, 1981

A longitudinal study of a profoundly deaf young child learning oral language with the aid of a vibrotactile communication device was conducted for 10 months. Audio-and videotapes and written observational notes were collected on Tabitha from ages 33–43 months while she used the device. At 33 months, Tabitha produced limited vocalization and inconsistently understood five words through speechreading. After 10 months of training with the device and traditional aural-oral teaching techniques, this child acquired an understanding of 469 words. A composite list of the first 100 words that Tabitha understood through speechreading was analyzed and compared with data from a group of younger, hearing children. The profoundly deaf child exhibited a similar developmental pattern for rate of acquisition and stages of lexical comprehension. Both Tabitha and the hearing children understood more than one class of words from the beginning. Word-order differences were found for the profoundly deaf child and reflected teaching techniques.

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