Psychological Assessment of Speech- and Language-Disordered Children Recent evidence indicates a high prevalence of psychological problems among children with articulation and language disorders. These findings are reviewed and implications drawn as to the role of the speech-language pathologist in behavior problem identification, referral, and therapy. For the screening of relevant behavior traits, a battery of psychological tests, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1983
Psychological Assessment of Speech- and Language-Disordered Children
 
Author Notes
  • Marcie Waller, Ph.D., is a law student at Case Western Reserve University. Robert Sollod, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology, and Eric Sander, Ph.D., Professor, and Elizabeth Kunicki, M.A., Clinical Supervisor, are with the Department of Speech and Hearing, all of Cleveland State University. Requests for reprints may be addressed to Ms. Kunicki at Cleveland State University, Euclid and 22nd Streets, Cleveland, OH 44115.
    Marcie Waller, Ph.D., is a law student at Case Western Reserve University. Robert Sollod, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology, and Eric Sander, Ph.D., Professor, and Elizabeth Kunicki, M.A., Clinical Supervisor, are with the Department of Speech and Hearing, all of Cleveland State University. Requests for reprints may be addressed to Ms. Kunicki at Cleveland State University, Euclid and 22nd Streets, Cleveland, OH 44115.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1983
Psychological Assessment of Speech- and Language-Disordered Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1983, Vol. 14, 92-98. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1402.92
History: Received September 17, 1981 , Accepted December 17, 1981
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1983, Vol. 14, 92-98. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1402.92
History: Received September 17, 1981; Accepted December 17, 1981

Recent evidence indicates a high prevalence of psychological problems among children with articulation and language disorders. These findings are reviewed and implications drawn as to the role of the speech-language pathologist in behavior problem identification, referral, and therapy. For the screening of relevant behavior traits, a battery of psychological tests, including both parent-teacher questionnaires and child performance measures, is suggested and discussed.

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