Children's Phonatory Matching of Pure-Tone and Human Voice Stimulus Thirty-six children were tested for their ability to vocally match both human voice and pure-tone stimuli. Spectrographic and statistical analysis of their tape-recorded responses revealed the majority of the children more closely approximated the human voice stimulus. The effects of age and sex of the children on their ability to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1983
Children's Phonatory Matching of Pure-Tone and Human Voice Stimulus
 
Author Notes
  • Carl R. Schneiderman, Ph.D., is with the Communication Disorders Program, Daggy Hall, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, where requests for reprints should be directed. Elizabeth C. Somerville, M.S., is a Communication Disorders Specialist with the Tacoma School District, Tacoma, WA 98407.
    Carl R. Schneiderman, Ph.D., is with the Communication Disorders Program, Daggy Hall, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, where requests for reprints should be directed. Elizabeth C. Somerville, M.S., is a Communication Disorders Specialist with the Tacoma School District, Tacoma, WA 98407.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1983
Children's Phonatory Matching of Pure-Tone and Human Voice Stimulus
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1983, Vol. 14, 75-78. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1402.75
History: Received April 22, 1981 , Accepted November 2, 1981
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1983, Vol. 14, 75-78. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1402.75
History: Received April 22, 1981; Accepted November 2, 1981

Thirty-six children were tested for their ability to vocally match both human voice and pure-tone stimuli. Spectrographic and statistical analysis of their tape-recorded responses revealed the majority of the children more closely approximated the human voice stimulus. The effects of age and sex of the children on their ability to match the two types of stimuli were also examined. The results of this study indicate that children are better able to match audiotape recordings of trained human voices modeling a wide range of calibrated frequencies than pure tones generated by an audio-oscillator.

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