Teachers' Perceptions of Students Who Wear Hearing Aids An Empirical Test Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1983
Teachers' Perceptions of Students Who Wear Hearing Aids
 
Author Notes
  • Judy A. Brimacombe is affiliated with the House Ear Institute in Los Angeles, CA. Jeffrey L. Danhauer and Anthony Mulac are both aJfiliated with the Department of Speech, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106. Requests for reprints should be sent to Jeffrey L. Danhauer at this address
    Judy A. Brimacombe is affiliated with the House Ear Institute in Los Angeles, CA. Jeffrey L. Danhauer and Anthony Mulac are both aJfiliated with the Department of Speech, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106. Requests for reprints should be sent to Jeffrey L. Danhauer at this address×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1983
Teachers' Perceptions of Students Who Wear Hearing Aids
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1983, Vol. 14, 128-135. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1402.128
History: Received September 29, 1981 , Accepted February 12, 1982
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1983, Vol. 14, 128-135. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1402.128
History: Received September 29, 1981; Accepted February 12, 1982

This study assessed whether teachers' perceptions of students differ when students wear hearing aids as compared to when they wear no aids, and whether teachers' perceptions differ depending on the amount of experience the teachers have had with hearing-impaired students. Stimuli were photographic slides of nine normal-hearing boys wearing (a) body-type, (b) postauricular type, and (c) no hearing aids. Slides were presented in counterbalanced showings to (a) 21 teachers having no formal experience with hearing-impaired students, (b) 26 teachers having some experience with mainstreamed hearing-impaired students, and (c) 19 teachers of the communicatively handicapped. The teachers rated each student on a semantic differential containing 16 bipolar adjective scales. Factor analysis of the ratings resulted in four factors of judgment: Appearance, Personality, Socioeconomic Status, and Assertiveness. A multivariate analysis of variance indicated that when students were depicted wearing a hearing aid, they were perceived differently than when they wore no aid. Univariate analyses showed (a) students wearing a body aid were rated more positively on Personality variables than when they were shown in the postauricular or no aid conditions, and (b) students wearing a body aid or no aid were rated higher on Assertiveness than those shown wearing a postauricular aid. No differences were found in the way the three teacher groups reacted to the three hearing aid conditions.

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