Performance of Kindergarten through Fifth-Grade Children on Oral Rote Sequencing and Semiautomated Language Tasks Six groups of normal-hearing elementary school-age children from kindergarten through the fifth grade performed a series of rote sequencing language tasks, which included the following: counting, saying the alphabet, naming the days in the week, and naming the months in the year. In addition, the 180 children were asked to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1983
Performance of Kindergarten through Fifth-Grade Children on Oral Rote Sequencing and Semiautomated Language Tasks
 
Author Notes
  • Ralph R. Rupp is a Professor of Education and Audiology in the School of Education, University of Michigan, 1111 E. Catherine Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, where requests for reprints should be directed.
    Ralph R. Rupp is a Professor of Education and Audiology in the School of Education, University of Michigan, 1111 E. Catherine Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, where requests for reprints should be directed.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1983
Performance of Kindergarten through Fifth-Grade Children on Oral Rote Sequencing and Semiautomated Language Tasks
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1983, Vol. 14, 105-113. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1402.105
History: Received April 20, 1981 , Accepted December 28, 1981
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1983, Vol. 14, 105-113. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1402.105
History: Received April 20, 1981; Accepted December 28, 1981

Six groups of normal-hearing elementary school-age children from kindergarten through the fifth grade performed a series of rote sequencing language tasks, which included the following: counting, saying the alphabet, naming the days in the week, and naming the months in the year. In addition, the 180 children were asked to name as many colors as they could and were asked to answer the question, "When is your birthday?" For the six automatic and semiautomatic expressive language tasks, maturational trends were noted for all observations. Marked differences were noted for skills in naming the days and months and for identifying birthdates from youngest to oldest groups. However, minimal change was noted for counting, alphabet, and naming colors across the grades. Central tendency values and standard deviations by grades for the six tasks are reported. These performance data may be used clinically in the screening of language usage.

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