Pluralistic Assessment in Speech-Language Pathology Use of Dual Norms in the Placement Process Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1983
Pluralistic Assessment in Speech-Language Pathology
 
Author Notes
  • Caroline Ramsey Musselwhite is a Speech-Language Pathologist at the Irene Wortham Center, 916 West Chapel Road, Asheville, NC 28803, where requests for reprints should be sent.
    Caroline Ramsey Musselwhite is a Speech-Language Pathologist at the Irene Wortham Center, 916 West Chapel Road, Asheville, NC 28803, where requests for reprints should be sent.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1983
Pluralistic Assessment in Speech-Language Pathology
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1983, Vol. 14, 29-37. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1401.29
History: Received March 7, 1980 , Accepted August 3, 1981
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1983, Vol. 14, 29-37. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1401.29
History: Received March 7, 1980; Accepted August 3, 1981

The issue of nondiscriminatory testing is considered relative to recent legislation and landmark court cases. Several studies are reviewed which suggest the existence of biased tests and/or norms in the field of speech-language pathology. This study considered the use of the Test for Auditory Comprehension of Language with low socioeconomic status children. Six of the eight age groups tested had raw score means that fell more than 1 standard deviation (SD) below the means of the middle socioeconomic status groups (from the published test norms). It is suggested that clinicians making placement decisions regarding groups that differ racially and/or culturally from the normative population for a test consider using a strategy of pluralistic assessment. This would involve the use of both peer group and standard group norms in decision-making.

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