High-Frequency Loss of Hearing in Secondary School Students An Investigation of Possible Etiologic Factors Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1983
High-Frequency Loss of Hearing in Secondary School Students
 
Author Notes
  • Charles Woodford is an Associate Professor with the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 805 Allen Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, where requests for reprints should be sent. Mary Lynn O'Farrell is an Educational Audiologist with the Regional Education Services Agency in Charleston, WV.
    Charles Woodford is an Associate Professor with the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 805 Allen Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, where requests for reprints should be sent. Mary Lynn O'Farrell is an Educational Audiologist with the Regional Education Services Agency in Charleston, WV.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1983
High-Frequency Loss of Hearing in Secondary School Students
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1983, Vol. 14, 22-28. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1401.22
History: Received February 20, 1981 , Accepted June 17, 1981
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1983, Vol. 14, 22-28. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1401.22
History: Received February 20, 1981; Accepted June 17, 1981

Data were collected on sound levels in public school shops, the policies regarding hearing protection and sound level monitoring in shops in a four-state area, and hearing levels of students with varying histories of noise exposure. Results of this study warrant three conclusions: (a) Sound levels in most school shops are sufficient to constitute a hazard to hearing. (b) A very small percentage of the shop programs surveyed furnish hearing protection or monitor sound levels. (c) Students involved in shop activities and/or use firearms are more apt to have high-frequency loss of hearing than those not participating in these activities. These findings are discussed in terms of implications for the involved students and the role of audiology as a profession in the public schools.

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