Walt Disney World, Clinical Practice, and Scholarly Journals I just got back from Disneyworld. My wife, my grown children, my grandson, and I visited the Magic Kingdom this past week. My grandson, Gage, is just about 2 years old. Although I have been to Disneyworld before, and Disneyland even more times, this was a new experience for ... Editorial
Editorial  |   April 01, 2007
Walt Disney World, Clinical Practice, and Scholarly Journals
 
Author Notes
  • Kenn Apel, PhDEditor
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   April 01, 2007
Walt Disney World, Clinical Practice, and Scholarly Journals
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2007, Vol. 38, 91. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/008)
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2007, Vol. 38, 91. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/008)
I just got back from Disneyworld. My wife, my grown children, my grandson, and I visited the Magic Kingdom this past week. My grandson, Gage, is just about 2 years old. Although I have been to Disneyworld before, and Disneyland even more times, this was a new experience for me, as I was viewing it through the eyes of a 2-year-old.
As I viewed the Magic Kingdom through Gage’s eyes, I was struck by how Disney “does it right.” And it made me think about evidence-based practice. Now, you might think that is quite an odd pairing: Walt Disney World and evidence-based practice. But I believe the analogy works. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) defines evidence-based practice as a clinical decision-making process that fosters the integration of high-quality research evidence with clinician expertise and clients' culture, preferences, values, and beliefs (ASHA, 2005). In the Magic Kingdom, this three-pronged approach is quite evident throughout the park:
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access