Article  |   April 2011
Evidence-Based Practice for Children With Speech Sound Disorders: Part 1 Narrative Review
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elise Baker
    The University of Sydney, Australia
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Sharynne McLeod
    Charles Sturt University, Australia
    Charles Sturt University, Australia
  • Correspondence to Elise Baker: elise.baker@sydney.edu.au
  • Editor: Kenn Apel
    Editor: Kenn Apel×
  • Associate Editor: Peter Flipsen, Jr.
    Associate Editor: Peter Flipsen, Jr.×
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice
Article   |   April 2011
Evidence-Based Practice for Children With Speech Sound Disorders: Part 1 Narrative Review
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools April 2011, Vol.42, 102-139. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2010/09-0075)
History: Accepted 10 Aug 2010 , Received 04 Nov 2009 , Revised 06 Apr 2010
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools April 2011, Vol.42, 102-139. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2010/09-0075)
History: Accepted 10 Aug 2010 , Received 04 Nov 2009 , Revised 06 Apr 2010

Purpose: This article provides a comprehensive narrative review of intervention studies for children with speech sound disorders (SSD). Its companion paper (Baker & McLeod, 2011) provides a tutorial and clinical example of how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can engage in evidence-based practice (EBP) for this clinical population.

Method: Studies reporting speech sound intervention for children with SSDs published from 1979 to 2009 were identified and coded.

Results: One hundred thirty-four intervention studies were identified. Intervention typically was conducted by an SLP in a one-to-one individual format for 30- to 60-min sessions 2 to 3 times per week. Total duration of intervention (from assessment to discharge) was reported for 10 studies and ranged from 3 to 46 months. Most studies were either Level IIb (quasi-experimental studies, 41.5%) or Level III (nonexperimental case studies, 32.6%). Single-case experimental design (29.6%) was the most frequently used experimental research design. There were 7 distinct approaches to target selection and 46 distinct intervention approaches, with 23 described in more than 1 publication. Each approach was associated with varying quantities and levels of evidence, according to research design.

Conclusion: Collaborative research reflecting higher levels of evidence using rigorous experimental designs is needed to compare the relative benefits of different intervention approaches.

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