Assessing Speech Intelligibility in Children With Hearing Loss: Toward Revitalizing a Valuable Clinical Tool Background Newborn hearing screening, early intervention programs, and advancements in cochlear implant and hearing aid technology have greatly increased opportunities for children with hearing loss to become intelligible talkers. Optimizing speech intelligibility requires that progress be monitored closely. Although direct assessment of intelligibility has been a cumbersome undertaking, advancements in ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   January 01, 2011
Assessing Speech Intelligibility in Children With Hearing Loss: Toward Revitalizing a Valuable Clinical Tool
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David J. Ertmer
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: David J. Ertmer, 500 Oval Drive, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2038. E-mail: dertmer@purdue.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   January 01, 2011
Assessing Speech Intelligibility in Children With Hearing Loss: Toward Revitalizing a Valuable Clinical Tool
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2011, Vol. 42, 52-58. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2010/09-0081)
History: Received December 2, 2009 , Revised March 20, 2010 , Accepted May 24, 2010
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2011, Vol. 42, 52-58. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2010/09-0081)
History: Received December 2, 2009; Revised March 20, 2010; Accepted May 24, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Background Newborn hearing screening, early intervention programs, and advancements in cochlear implant and hearing aid technology have greatly increased opportunities for children with hearing loss to become intelligible talkers. Optimizing speech intelligibility requires that progress be monitored closely. Although direct assessment of intelligibility has been a cumbersome undertaking, advancements in digital recording technology and expanded strategies for recruiting listener-judges can make this tool much more practical in contemporary school and clinical settings.

Purpose The main purposes of this tutorial are to present a rationale for assessing children’s connected speech intelligibility, review important uses for intelligibility scores, and describe time-efficient ways to estimate how well children’s connected speech can be understood. This information is offered to encourage routine assessment of connected speech intelligibility in preschool and school-age children with hearing loss.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was supported by a grant from the National Institutes on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R01DC-007863). Special thanks to Wendy Ban, Monica Brumbaugh, Brandy Harveth, and Monica Lynch at Child’s Voice School in Wood Dale, IL; Nancy Smiley at the St. Joseph Institute in Chesterfield, MO; and Jean Moog and Christine Gustus at the Moog Center in Chesterfield, MO for sharing their insights about the status of speech intelligibility assessment in school settings.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access