Narratives A New Look at Communication Problems in Older Language-Disordered Children Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   July 01, 1982
Narratives
 
Author Notes
  • Judith R. Johnston, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech arm Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, where requests for reprints may be sent.
    Judith R. Johnston, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech arm Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, where requests for reprints may be sent.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1982
Narratives
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1982, Vol. 13, 144-155. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1303.144
History: Received March 9, 1981 , Accepted April 9, 1981
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1982, Vol. 13, 144-155. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1303.144
History: Received March 9, 1981; Accepted April 9, 1981

The recent literature on discourse suggests four perspectives which may be applied in narrative analysis. Narratives may be viewed as suprasentential discourse units with underlying organizational rules or story grammars; as conceptual units which reveal the speaker's expectations about event sequences or scripts; as linguistic expressions requiring specific formal devices to bind them into coherent texts; and as communication events which demand thoughtful assessment of the listener's needs. This report reviews each of these perspectives on narrative, indicating pertinent theoretical issues and developmental trends. It concludes with a case study presentation that illustrates how these perspectives can be used to analyze the narratives of older language-disordered children.

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