The Effects of Open-Space versus Traditional, Self-Contained Classrooms on the Auditory Selective Attending Skills of Elementary School Children The effects of the open-space classroom and the traditional, self-contained classroom on the auditory selective attending skills of elementary school children were studied. Thirty-eight fourth-grade children, 19 from each setting, were given the Flowers Auditory Test of Selective Attention. The test required increasingly more sophisticated auditory watchkeeping skills over longer ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1982
The Effects of Open-Space versus Traditional, Self-Contained Classrooms on the Auditory Selective Attending Skills of Elementary School Children
 
Author Notes
  • Debra Louise Barnett is a Language, Speech, and Hearing Specialist with the Santee School District, Santee, CA. Alan C. Nichols is Acting Chairman, Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University. Darlene Geer Gould is Assistant Professor and Clinic Coordinator, Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182; requests for reprints may be sent to her there.
    Debra Louise Barnett is a Language, Speech, and Hearing Specialist with the Santee School District, Santee, CA. Alan C. Nichols is Acting Chairman, Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University. Darlene Geer Gould is Assistant Professor and Clinic Coordinator, Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182; requests for reprints may be sent to her there.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1982
The Effects of Open-Space versus Traditional, Self-Contained Classrooms on the Auditory Selective Attending Skills of Elementary School Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1982, Vol. 13, 138-143. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1303.138
History: Received August 22, 1980 , Accepted April 7, 1981
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1982, Vol. 13, 138-143. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1303.138
History: Received August 22, 1980; Accepted April 7, 1981

The effects of the open-space classroom and the traditional, self-contained classroom on the auditory selective attending skills of elementary school children were studied. Thirty-eight fourth-grade children, 19 from each setting, were given the Flowers Auditory Test of Selective Attention. The test required increasingly more sophisticated auditory watchkeeping skills over longer periods of time. Results indicated that children from the open-space classrooms achieved significantly higher scores on the FATSA than did children from the traditional classrooms. It was concluded, based upon the results of this study, that children who are exposed to varying and unpredictable auditory distractions in their classroom environments are better able to perform on a task requiring auditory vigilance skills in the presence of distracting background noise.

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