A Comparison of Phonological Processes Identified Through Word and Sentence Imitation Tasks of the PPA An investigation was conducted to determine whether or not similar phonological processes would be identified when responses obtained through a delayed word imitation task were compared to those obtained through a delayed sentence imitation task. Both methodologies are used in the Phonological Process Analysis instrument developed by Weiner, the tool ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1982
A Comparison of Phonological Processes Identified Through Word and Sentence Imitation Tasks of the PPA
 
Author Notes
  • Nicholas W. Bankson, Ph.D., is Professor and Chairman, Department of Communication Disorders, BostonUniversity, 48 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215; requests for reprints should be sent to him there.John E. Bernthal, Ph.D., is Associate Professor and Chairman, Department of Speech Pathology andAudiology, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls.
    Nicholas W. Bankson, Ph.D., is Professor and Chairman, Department of Communication Disorders, BostonUniversity, 48 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215; requests for reprints should be sent to him there.John E. Bernthal, Ph.D., is Associate Professor and Chairman, Department of Speech Pathology andAudiology, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1982
A Comparison of Phonological Processes Identified Through Word and Sentence Imitation Tasks of the PPA
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1982, Vol. 13, 96-99. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1302.96
History: Received June 22, 1981 , Accepted September 8, 1981
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1982, Vol. 13, 96-99. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1302.96
History: Received June 22, 1981; Accepted September 8, 1981

An investigation was conducted to determine whether or not similar phonological processes would be identified when responses obtained through a delayed word imitation task were compared to those obtained through a delayed sentence imitation task. Both methodologies are used in the Phonological Process Analysis instrument developed by Weiner, the tool which constituted the basis for this study. Responses obtained through the two procedures did not differ significantly and indicated that one method is as likely as another to facilitate the identification of processes or patterns that may be present in the speech of children with multiple articulation errors.

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