A Format for Selecting Vocabulary for the Nonspeaking Child A format was developed to help the parents, teachers, and others become sensitive to the specific vocabulary needs of the nonspeaking child. Out of this awareness came an ability to identify the existing words in the child's vocabulary pool. This pool became the source of words for later representation in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1981
A Format for Selecting Vocabulary for the Nonspeaking Child
 
Author Notes
  • Faith Carlson is a Speech-Language Pathologist at the Meyer Children's Rehabilitation Institute, Omaha, Nebraska. She is Assistant Professor, Division of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Nebraska Medical Center. Send reprint requests to her at Meyer Children's Rehabilitation Institute, 444 South 44th Street,. Omaha, Nebraska 68131.
    Faith Carlson is a Speech-Language Pathologist at the Meyer Children's Rehabilitation Institute, Omaha, Nebraska. She is Assistant Professor, Division of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Nebraska Medical Center. Send reprint requests to her at Meyer Children's Rehabilitation Institute, 444 South 44th Street,. Omaha, Nebraska 68131.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1981
A Format for Selecting Vocabulary for the Nonspeaking Child
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1981, Vol. 12, 240-245. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1204.240
History: Received March 3, 1980 , Accepted July 18, 1980
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1981, Vol. 12, 240-245. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1204.240
History: Received March 3, 1980; Accepted July 18, 1980

A format was developed to help the parents, teachers, and others become sensitive to the specific vocabulary needs of the nonspeaking child. Out of this awareness came an ability to identify the existing words in the child's vocabulary pool. This pool became the source of words for later representation in the child's nonspeech lexicon and also served as a source for the adult to model communication in the child's symbol system. The opportunity for nonspeech language interaction and creative vocabulary selection was provided which more closely paralleled that which occurs in the normal development of speech as language symbols.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access