A Discussion of Communicative Strategies and Patterns by Nonspeaking Persons Interaction patterns and strategies of communication used by nonspeaking persons are described, pertaining to eight methods of communication frequently utilized by nonspeakers. Although these communication forms are generally recognized and used by the public at large, they have greater value for handicapped communicators. Professional and societal implications of greater exposure ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1981
A Discussion of Communicative Strategies and Patterns by Nonspeaking Persons
 
Author Notes
  • Howard Shane is Director of Speech Pathology and Audiology in the Developmental Evaluation Clinic, Children's Hospital Medical Center, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. Reprint requests may be directed to him there. Carol Cohen is a Speech Pathologist for United Cerebral Palsy and Handicapped Children's Association, Syracuse, New York, and a nonspeech consultant to the Central New York Public School Districts.
    Howard Shane is Director of Speech Pathology and Audiology in the Developmental Evaluation Clinic, Children's Hospital Medical Center, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. Reprint requests may be directed to him there. Carol Cohen is a Speech Pathologist for United Cerebral Palsy and Handicapped Children's Association, Syracuse, New York, and a nonspeech consultant to the Central New York Public School Districts.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1981
A Discussion of Communicative Strategies and Patterns by Nonspeaking Persons
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1981, Vol. 12, 205-210. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1204.205
History: Received July 6, 1979 , Accepted August 14, 1980
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1981, Vol. 12, 205-210. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1204.205
History: Received July 6, 1979; Accepted August 14, 1980

Interaction patterns and strategies of communication used by nonspeaking persons are described, pertaining to eight methods of communication frequently utilized by nonspeakers. Although these communication forms are generally recognized and used by the public at large, they have greater value for handicapped communicators. Professional and societal implications of greater exposure to nonspeaking persons in general and augmentative systems in particular are also described.

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