Language Comprehension Testing The Influence of Three Modes of Test Administration and Cognitive Tempo on the Performance of Preschool Children Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1981
Language Comprehension Testing
 
Author Notes
  • William O. Haynes and Mary Beth McCallion are associated with the Speech and Hearing Clinic of Auburn University. Requests for reprints may be sent to Haynes at the Speech and Hearing Clinic, Department of Speech Communication, School of Arts and Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36830.
    William O. Haynes and Mary Beth McCallion are associated with the Speech and Hearing Clinic of Auburn University. Requests for reprints may be sent to Haynes at the Speech and Hearing Clinic, Department of Speech Communication, School of Arts and Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36830.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1981
Language Comprehension Testing
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1981, Vol. 12, 74-81. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1202.74
History: Received February 19, 1980 , Accepted July 16, 1980
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1981, Vol. 12, 74-81. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1202.74
History: Received February 19, 1980; Accepted July 16, 1980

Language comprehension performance on the Test of Auditory Comprehension of Language (TACL) was investigated using three modes of test administration with 24 four-year-old children representing various categories of cognitive tempo. The test administration modes consisted of a standard TACL administration, an imitative administration, and a two-auditory stimulus administration. The subjects were placed in three groups. There were two experimental groups based on a cognitive tempo index (reflective and impulsive) and one control group. Each subject's expressive language ability was also analyzed using the Developmental Sentence Score (DSS). Results indicated that all subjects had similar expressive language abilities. The reflective children, however, scored significantly better than the other groups on the three TACL administrations. Also, all three groups scored significantly higher on both modified versions of the TACL than on the standard administration. Implications of these results for language comprehension testing are discussed. It is suggested that speech-language pathologists/researchers reevaluate the constructs on which current comprehension testing is based and investigate the effects of altered administration modes on both normal-language and language-disordered populations.

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