Facilitating Reading Development with Speech- and Language-Impaired Children Because reading is a language-based skill and many communicatively handicapped youngsters experience difficulties with it, speech-language pathologists have important roles in assisting with reading development for these children. Our knowledge about language and requisite skills for reading may benefit these children in developing reading skills. Speech-language pathologists' roles may be ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1981
Facilitating Reading Development with Speech- and Language-Impaired Children
 
Author Notes
  • Kenneth G. Shipley is presently Associate Professor of Communicative Disorders, California State University-Fresno. Stephen C. McFarlane is Chairman and Associate Professor, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Nevada-Reno. Requests for reprints may be sent to Shipley at the Department of Communicative Disorders, Division of Health Professions, California State University, Fresno, CA 93740.
    Kenneth G. Shipley is presently Associate Professor of Communicative Disorders, California State University-Fresno. Stephen C. McFarlane is Chairman and Associate Professor, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Nevada-Reno. Requests for reprints may be sent to Shipley at the Department of Communicative Disorders, Division of Health Professions, California State University, Fresno, CA 93740.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1981
Facilitating Reading Development with Speech- and Language-Impaired Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1981, Vol. 12, 100-106. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1202.100
History: Received December 14, 1979 , Accepted June 12, 1980
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1981, Vol. 12, 100-106. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1202.100
History: Received December 14, 1979; Accepted June 12, 1980

Because reading is a language-based skill and many communicatively handicapped youngsters experience difficulties with it, speech-language pathologists have important roles in assisting with reading development for these children. Our knowledge about language and requisite skills for reading may benefit these children in developing reading skills. Speech-language pathologists' roles may be direct or indirect, and may be with preschool or school-aged children. Suggestions are offered for use in speech-language sessions and with teachers or parents.

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