Hearing Screening in a School for the Severely-Profoundly Intellectually-Impaired and Multiply-Handicapped Students A hearing screening program was organized, supervised, and followed up in a secondary public school for a population of severely-profoundly intellectually-impaired and multiply-handicapped students who had no previous history of an auditory screening by the school system. The program was implemented using public school personnel and equipment without incurring additional ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1981
Hearing Screening in a School for the Severely-Profoundly Intellectually-Impaired and Multiply-Handicapped Students
 
Author Notes
  • Linda Yaffe is an educational audiologist for the Baltimore City Department of Education, Division for Exceptional Children, Calvert and 23rd Streets, Baltimore, MD 21218. Requests for reprints may be sent there.
    Linda Yaffe is an educational audiologist for the Baltimore City Department of Education, Division for Exceptional Children, Calvert and 23rd Streets, Baltimore, MD 21218. Requests for reprints may be sent there.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1981
Hearing Screening in a School for the Severely-Profoundly Intellectually-Impaired and Multiply-Handicapped Students
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1981, Vol. 12, 20-25. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1201.20
History: Received June 22, 1979 , Accepted May 6, 1980
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1981, Vol. 12, 20-25. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1201.20
History: Received June 22, 1979; Accepted May 6, 1980

A hearing screening program was organized, supervised, and followed up in a secondary public school for a population of severely-profoundly intellectually-impaired and multiply-handicapped students who had no previous history of an auditory screening by the school system. The program was implemented using public school personnel and equipment without incurring additional expenses. Results were considered significant in that 11% of the students screened were identified as potentially hearing-impaired as compared to 4% of the regular Baltimore City School student population who failed hearing screenings. This 4% was reduced because 35% of the students identified and tested by the Baltimore City Health Department had normal hearing and no evidence of middle ear dysfunction. In contrast, 95.8% of the 24 mentally retarded students identified exhibited evidence of at least some reduction in hearing or middle ear dysfunction. The hearing screening proved effective in identifying existing ear problems.

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