Counseling Parents of the Hearing-Impaired Child during the Post-Diagnostic Period Because speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and teachers of the hearing-impaired have contact with parents of the hearing-impaired child, they are urged to undertake the responsibility of providing supportive counseling to these parents during the period following diagnosis of hearing impairment. Such a service requires a broader professional role than may previously ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1980
Counseling Parents of the Hearing-Impaired Child during the Post-Diagnostic Period
 
Author Notes
  • Felicia Denise Schmaman is affiliated with the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Witwatersrand, No. 1 Jan Smuts Avenue, Braamfontein 2001, Johannesburg, South Africa. Request for reprints may be sent there. Gillian Straker is also affiliated with the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Felicia Denise Schmaman is affiliated with the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Witwatersrand, No. 1 Jan Smuts Avenue, Braamfontein 2001, Johannesburg, South Africa. Request for reprints may be sent there. Gillian Straker is also affiliated with the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1980
Counseling Parents of the Hearing-Impaired Child during the Post-Diagnostic Period
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1980, Vol. 11, 251-259. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1104.251
History: Received August 9, 1979 , Accepted February 19, 1980
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1980, Vol. 11, 251-259. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1104.251
History: Received August 9, 1979; Accepted February 19, 1980

Because speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and teachers of the hearing-impaired have contact with parents of the hearing-impaired child, they are urged to undertake the responsibility of providing supportive counseling to these parents during the period following diagnosis of hearing impairment. Such a service requires a broader professional role than may previously have been envisioned. The authors suggest that the counseling program be aimed at both the growth of the family as a whole as well as that of the hearing-impaired child. It should promote the succession of stages that parents appear to pass through in the process of acknowledging their child's handicap. The nature of the parents' feelings, the source of their feelings, and ways in which the professional involved may deal with these feelings are discussed. Examples from the writers' clinical experience are presented.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access