Oral Language Performance of Upper Elementary School Students Obtained via Story Reformulation Data are presented on the mean length of utterance, use of five syntactical structures, and use of five features of story content that characterized the oral language of four grade levels (4th–7th) of students within a 240-student population (60 at each level) as they reformulated a complex story. The interplay ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1980
Oral Language Performance of Upper Elementary School Students Obtained via Story Reformulation
 
Author Notes
  • Gerald E. Chappell is affiliated with the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. Requests for reprints may be sent to Chappell at the Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Stevens Point, Wisconsin 54481.
    Gerald E. Chappell is affiliated with the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. Requests for reprints may be sent to Chappell at the Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Stevens Point, Wisconsin 54481.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1980
Oral Language Performance of Upper Elementary School Students Obtained via Story Reformulation
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1980, Vol. 11, 236-250. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1104.236
History: Received September 10, 1979 , Accepted February 1, 1980
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1980, Vol. 11, 236-250. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1104.236
History: Received September 10, 1979; Accepted February 1, 1980

Data are presented on the mean length of utterance, use of five syntactical structures, and use of five features of story content that characterized the oral language of four grade levels (4th–7th) of students within a 240-student population (60 at each level) as they reformulated a complex story. The interplay between the syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of the oral language performance is discussed. Performance features and their cutoff criteria are suggested for a clinical use of the reformulation task in an initial pass/fail screening of the oral language ability of students at the upper elementary school level. A recommended analysis procedure is also presented.

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