An Examination of Possible Sexist Attitudes among Speech-Language Pathologists toward Their Clients This study examines the attitudes of speech-language pathologists regarding perceived sex role stereotypes associated with certain behavioral characteristics presented by clients. A survey questionnaire was administered to 40 speech-language pathologists at a state speech-language-hearing association convention. The results indicate that the sex of a client does affect the extent to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1980
An Examination of Possible Sexist Attitudes among Speech-Language Pathologists toward Their Clients
 
Author Notes
  • Michael G. Grupp is a speech-language pathologist working with Communicative Health Care Associates in Waltham, Massachusetts. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at 264 Doyle Ave., Providence, RI 02906. Jodi L. Glass is an audiologist at Meeting Street School in East Providence, Rhode Island.
    Michael G. Grupp is a speech-language pathologist working with Communicative Health Care Associates in Waltham, Massachusetts. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at 264 Doyle Ave., Providence, RI 02906. Jodi L. Glass is an audiologist at Meeting Street School in East Providence, Rhode Island.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1980
An Examination of Possible Sexist Attitudes among Speech-Language Pathologists toward Their Clients
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1980, Vol. 11, 180-187. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1103.180
History: Received March 26, 1979 , Accepted November 16, 1979
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1980, Vol. 11, 180-187. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1103.180
History: Received March 26, 1979; Accepted November 16, 1979

This study examines the attitudes of speech-language pathologists regarding perceived sex role stereotypes associated with certain behavioral characteristics presented by clients. A survey questionnaire was administered to 40 speech-language pathologists at a state speech-language-hearing association convention. The results indicate that the sex of a client does affect the extent to which speech-language pathologists would modify sex stereotyped behaviors.

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