Attitudes of Educators toward Speech-Language Pathology Services in Rural Schools The Scale of Educators' Attitudes Toward Speech Pathology (SEASP) was administered to school personnel in two rural county school systems, including: teachers in kindergarten through third grade, teachers in grades four through eight, and special education teachers. Analysis of responses showed that all three groups demonstrated a favorable attitude toward ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1980
Attitudes of Educators toward Speech-Language Pathology Services in Rural Schools
 
Author Notes
  • Dennis M. Ruscello, Norman J. Lass, Nancy K. Fultz, and Mary J. Hug are affiliated with West Virginia University. Requests for reprints may be sent to Ruscello at the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 805 Allen Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506.
    Dennis M. Ruscello, Norman J. Lass, Nancy K. Fultz, and Mary J. Hug are affiliated with West Virginia University. Requests for reprints may be sent to Ruscello at the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 805 Allen Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1980
Attitudes of Educators toward Speech-Language Pathology Services in Rural Schools
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1980, Vol. 11, 145-153. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1103.145
History: Received August 22, 1979 , Accepted October 9, 1979
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1980, Vol. 11, 145-153. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1103.145
History: Received August 22, 1979; Accepted October 9, 1979

The Scale of Educators' Attitudes Toward Speech Pathology (SEASP) was administered to school personnel in two rural county school systems, including: teachers in kindergarten through third grade, teachers in grades four through eight, and special education teachers. Analysis of responses showed that all three groups demonstrated a favorable attitude toward their existing speech-language pathology programs. However, the overall scores of the special educators were higher than those found for the two other groups. In addition, there was a tendency across the groups to express the attitude that the speech clinician's case load was too large and the therapy time employed per case inadequate.

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