Response Patterns Characteristic of Verbal Expressive Disorders This paper examines the need to analyze free expression as part of an overall expressive language evaluation in school age children. Use of the Social Adjustment B subtest of the Detroit Tests of Learning Aptitude is advocated for this purpose. Seven language characteristics are identified which may help in recognizing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1980
Response Patterns Characteristic of Verbal Expressive Disorders
 
Author Notes
  • Ellen R. Schwartz is associate director of communication disorders and director of speech therapy at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Cynthia B. Solot is a speech-language pathologist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Requests for reprints may be sent to Schwartz at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
    Ellen R. Schwartz is associate director of communication disorders and director of speech therapy at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Cynthia B. Solot is a speech-language pathologist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Requests for reprints may be sent to Schwartz at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1980
Response Patterns Characteristic of Verbal Expressive Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1980, Vol. 11, 139-144. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1103.139
History: Received May 29, 1979 , Accepted October 8, 1979
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1980, Vol. 11, 139-144. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1103.139
History: Received May 29, 1979; Accepted October 8, 1979

This paper examines the need to analyze free expression as part of an overall expressive language evaluation in school age children. Use of the Social Adjustment B subtest of the Detroit Tests of Learning Aptitude is advocated for this purpose. Seven language characteristics are identified which may help in recognizing disorders of self-expression. Of the three identified groups of language impaired children, one group which is particularly vulnerable for associated school problems is discussed.

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