Three Variations of the Imperative Format of Language Sample Elicitation Language samples were elicited from 18 kindergarten and 18 second-grade subjects using three variations of an imperative sentence language sampling procedure. Variation I was a noun task in which the child was asked to describe a person, place, or thing, Variation II was a procedure task in which the child ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1980
Three Variations of the Imperative Format of Language Sample Elicitation
 
Author Notes
  • Caroline Ramsey Musselwhite is associated with the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Sandie Barrie-Blackley is a Speech and Language Specialist in Elkin, NC.
    Caroline Ramsey Musselwhite is associated with the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Sandie Barrie-Blackley is a Speech and Language Specialist in Elkin, NC.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1980
Three Variations of the Imperative Format of Language Sample Elicitation
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1980, Vol. 11, 56-67. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1101.56
History: Received August 15, 1978 , Accepted June 6, 1979
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1980, Vol. 11, 56-67. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1101.56
History: Received August 15, 1978; Accepted June 6, 1979

Language samples were elicited from 18 kindergarten and 18 second-grade subjects using three variations of an imperative sentence language sampling procedure. Variation I was a noun task in which the child was asked to describe a person, place, or thing, Variation II was a procedure task in which the child was asked to describe a procedure, and Variation III was an action task in which the child was asked to describe what his or her action would be following a hypothetical event. Six of the measures studied were found to be significantly affected by task, while eight measures were not. The results indicate a need to control the sampling procedure when eliciting language samples.

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