Attitudes and Training of Public School Clinicians Providing Services to Speakers of Black English This study investigated public school speech-language clinicians' attitudes regarding treatment goal-setting for children who were speakers of black English, as well as the need for university coursework in social dialects. Questionnaires, based upon Wolfram and Fasold's conceivable goals in teaching standard English to speakers of non-standard dialects, were distributed to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1980
Attitudes and Training of Public School Clinicians Providing Services to Speakers of Black English
 
Author Notes
  • Nicholas G. Bountress is an assistant professor of Communicative Disorders at the Darden School of Education, Old Dominion University, in Norfolk, VA 23508. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.
    Nicholas G. Bountress is an assistant professor of Communicative Disorders at the Darden School of Education, Old Dominion University, in Norfolk, VA 23508. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1980
Attitudes and Training of Public School Clinicians Providing Services to Speakers of Black English
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1980, Vol. 11, 41-49. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1101.41
History: Received October 18, 1978 , Accepted December 11, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1980, Vol. 11, 41-49. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1101.41
History: Received October 18, 1978; Accepted December 11, 1978

This study investigated public school speech-language clinicians' attitudes regarding treatment goal-setting for children who were speakers of black English, as well as the need for university coursework in social dialects. Questionnaires, based upon Wolfram and Fasold's conceivable goals in teaching standard English to speakers of non-standard dialects, were distributed to the 103 speech-language clinicians employed by the six metropolitan public school systems of Southeastern (Tidewater) Virginia. An examination of responses to the questionnaire items indicated that 97% of the respondents were of the opinion that speakers of black English should learn standard English while retaining the nonstandard dialect. Further information from the questionnaire indicated that only approximately one third of the respondents obtained information regarding dialects from coursework, with the primary source of knowledge being on-the-job experience. Slightly more than two thirds of all respondents indicated a need for formal coursework in social dialects, with the majority of these being recently graduated bachelor's level clinicians with less than six years of professional experience.

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