Heterogeneity as a Confounding Factor When Predicting Spontaneous Improvement of Misarticulated Consonants Responses to the Predictive Screening Test of Articulation (PSTA) were obtained from 460 first graders who presented varying patterns of misarticulation with respect to type, number, and consistency of sounds as measured by the Screening Deep Test of Articulation. PSTA item and total score performance varied among misarticulated subgroups. Across ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1980
Heterogeneity as a Confounding Factor When Predicting Spontaneous Improvement of Misarticulated Consonants
 
Author Notes
  • Ida J. Stockman is affiliated with the Department of Communications Arts and Sciences, Howard University, Washington, D.C. 20059. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Eugene T. McDonald is affiliated with Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pennsylvania.
    Ida J. Stockman is affiliated with the Department of Communications Arts and Sciences, Howard University, Washington, D.C. 20059. Requests for reprints may be sent there. Eugene T. McDonald is affiliated with Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pennsylvania.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1980
Heterogeneity as a Confounding Factor When Predicting Spontaneous Improvement of Misarticulated Consonants
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1980, Vol. 11, 15-29. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1101.15
History: Received June 9, 1978 , Accepted September 25, 1978
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1980, Vol. 11, 15-29. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1101.15
History: Received June 9, 1978; Accepted September 25, 1978

Responses to the Predictive Screening Test of Articulation (PSTA) were obtained from 460 first graders who presented varying patterns of misarticulation with respect to type, number, and consistency of sounds as measured by the Screening Deep Test of Articulation. PSTA item and total score performance varied among misarticulated subgroups. Across consonant subgroups, no single item or cutting score separated children in degree or type of misarticulation. The implication of this finding is that a single measure may not be able to differentiate children who will achieve normal articulation without rehabilitation from those who will not. Given the heterogeneity that exists among the impaired, efforts should be made to predict changes for sub-groups with well specified characteristics.

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