Speech and Articulatory Rates of School-Age Children in Conversation and Narrative Contexts Purpose This study provides preliminary reference data for speech and articulatory rates of school-age children in conversational and narrative speaking contexts. Method Participants included 36 typically developing children in 3 groups of 12 participants at ages 7, 9, and 11 years. Conversational and narrative speech rates were measured ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2007
Speech and Articulatory Rates of School-Age Children in Conversation and Narrative Contexts
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer A. Sturm
    University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
  • Carol H. Seery
    University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
  • Contact author: Carol H. Seery, PhD, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, Communication Sciences & Disorders Department, P.O. Box 413, Enderis Hall 873, Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413. E-mail: cseery@uwm.edu
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2007
Speech and Articulatory Rates of School-Age Children in Conversation and Narrative Contexts
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2007, Vol. 38, 47-59. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/005)
History: Received November 5, 2004 , Accepted June 27, 2006
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2007, Vol. 38, 47-59. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/005)
History: Received November 5, 2004; Accepted June 27, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

Purpose This study provides preliminary reference data for speech and articulatory rates of school-age children in conversational and narrative speaking contexts.

Method Participants included 36 typically developing children in 3 groups of 12 participants at ages 7, 9, and 11 years. Conversational and narrative speech rates were measured in words per minute, syllables per minute, and syllables per second.

Results Speaking rates increased with age between ages 7 and 9, but rates were similar between ages 9 and 11. Between contexts, only the words per minute measure was significantly higher (faster) in narrative than in conversation.

Implications These results are important to the assessment, treatment, and management of children with communication disorders in clinical or school settings.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was sponsored with funding from a University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee College of Health Sciences Graduate Student Research Award and a Wisconsin Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Association Foundation Student Research Grant.
Thanks to Kari Jensen, Nina Pyatskowit, and Molly Stapleton for assistance with the analyses of data validity and reliability. Thanks to Dr. Marylou Gelfer, Dr. Paula Rhyner, and Dr. Sherri Sieff for encouragement and guidance in the research process. A special thanks to Lisa Cottingham for pointing out to the first author that she had expressed a good idea for a research thesis. Thanks to Dr. Sue Cashin for her statistical consultation.
We are grateful to the Milwaukee Public Schools for their role in the facilitation of this research, and to Kia Gaumond and Kate Boesch, two SLPs who were especially helpful with subject recruitment.
Special thanks to the first author’s husband, Don; three children Nate, Kyle, and Maggie; and other family and friends whose support was essential to the accomplishment of this project.
This paper was presented at the 2004 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in Philadelphia, PA.
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