Increasing Print Awareness in Preschoolers With Language Impairment Using Non-Evocative Print Referencing Purpose This study examined the extent to which using non-evocative, explicit referencing of print concepts during shared storybook reading in the context of language therapy facilitated print concept knowledge in children with language impairment. Method Five children, ages 4 to 5 years, were provided scripted input on 20 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2007
Increasing Print Awareness in Preschoolers With Language Impairment Using Non-Evocative Print Referencing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sherri Lovelace
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Sharon R. Stewart
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Contact author: Sherri Lovelace, Arkansas State University, P.O. Box 910, State University, AR 72467. E-mail: slovelace@astate.edu
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2007
Increasing Print Awareness in Preschoolers With Language Impairment Using Non-Evocative Print Referencing
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2007, Vol. 38, 16-30. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/003)
History: Received March 5, 2005 , Revised November 13, 2005 , Accepted June 27, 2006
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2007, Vol. 38, 16-30. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/003)
History: Received March 5, 2005; Revised November 13, 2005; Accepted June 27, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 39

Purpose This study examined the extent to which using non-evocative, explicit referencing of print concepts during shared storybook reading in the context of language therapy facilitated print concept knowledge in children with language impairment.

Method Five children, ages 4 to 5 years, were provided scripted input on 20 print concepts during shared storybook reading that was incorporated into individualized 30-min language intervention sessions that were conducted in the children’s classroom twice weekly. The children were not required to make any response to the input on print concepts, and the input was secondary to instruction in the language targets during the 10-min shared storybook reading activity.

Results Using a single-subject, multiple probe design across subjects, results indicated that children’s knowledge of print concepts improved markedly when the procedure was incorporated into shared storybook reading and that they continued to learn and maintain knowledge of print concepts with repeated input.

Clinical Implications These findings suggest that children with language impairment may benefit from simple non-evocative, explicit referencing strategies that can be easily incorporated into the context of storybook reading during language therapy, thus providing speech-language pathologists with an additional tool for facilitating children’s literacy skills.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Financial support for this project was provided by Special Interest Division I: Language Learning and Education of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The work represents a research practicum by the first author during doctoral study in the Rehabilitation Sciences Program at the University of Kentucky. The second author served as mentor and contributor.
The authors offer thanks to John Schuster and Melinda Ault, who served as consultants in the design of this project. Appreciation is also given to SLPs Shelly Nead, Laura Sturgill, Emmi Markum, and Stacey Greene, and to the staff and children at the Jessamine County, Kentucky Early Learning Village.
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