Commentary on “Making Evidence-Based Decisions About Child Language Intervention in Schools” by Gillam and Gillam Purpose This paper is a personal reaction to Gillam and Gillam’s treatise on evidence-based decision making in schools. This evaluation focuses principally on the costs and benefits of clinicians' search for external evidence, potential problems associated with efforts to grade that evidence, and the integration of this evidence with “internal” ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 2006
Commentary on “Making Evidence-Based Decisions About Child Language Intervention in Schools” by Gillam and Gillam
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Contact author: Marc E. Fey, KUMC, Department of hearing and Speech, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160-7605. E-mail: mfey@kumc.edu
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 2006
Commentary on “Making Evidence-Based Decisions About Child Language Intervention in Schools” by Gillam and Gillam
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2006, Vol. 37, 316-319. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/036)
History: Received June 5, 2006 , Accepted June 9, 2006
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2006, Vol. 37, 316-319. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/036)
History: Received June 5, 2006; Accepted June 9, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Purpose This paper is a personal reaction to Gillam and Gillam’s treatise on evidence-based decision making in schools. This evaluation focuses principally on the costs and benefits of clinicians' search for external evidence, potential problems associated with efforts to grade that evidence, and the integration of this evidence with “internal” evidence related to specific children and their families, clinician preferences and experience, and the school setting.

Method Descriptive methods (that are not evidence-based) are used to evaluate critically Gillam and Gillam’s proposals on the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in schools.

Conclusion Early efforts to implement the plan for EBP illustrated by Gillam and Gillam are likely to be difficult, forcing clinicians to be flexible and patient. Nevertheless, if the plan is followed, it will result ultimately in improved speech-language pathology services in the schools and improved clinical research to support those services.

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