The Implications of RTI and EBP for SLPs: Commentary on L. M. Justice PurposeThis commentary responds to Justice’s article on response to intervention (RTI) and evidence-based practice (EBP) for reading instruction. The educational changes brought about by RTI and EBP provide an opportunity as well as a challenge for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to make fundamental changes in service delivery.MethodIn this article, I discuss ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 2006
The Implications of RTI and EBP for SLPs: Commentary on L. M. Justice
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Teresa A. Ukrainetz, PhD, Division of Communication Disorders, Dept. 3311, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University Ave, Laramie, WY 82071-3311. E-mail: tukraine@uwyo.edu
  • © 2006 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   October 2006
The Implications of RTI and EBP for SLPs: Commentary on L. M. Justice
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2006, Vol. 37, 298-303. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/034)
History: Received March 24, 2006 , Accepted April 26, 2006
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2006, Vol. 37, 298-303. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/034)
History: Received March 24, 2006; Accepted April 26, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

PurposeThis commentary responds to Justice’s article on response to intervention (RTI) and evidence-based practice (EBP) for reading instruction. The educational changes brought about by RTI and EBP provide an opportunity as well as a challenge for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to make fundamental changes in service delivery.

MethodIn this article, I discuss how RTI will change who qualifies as reading disabled and who receives special reading instruction. I examine how RTI might change who qualifies and how they qualify for speech-language services. Finally, I consider what can be taken from EPB and RTI to improve speech-language service delivery.

ConclusionRTI has the potential to fundamentally change regular education and its interface with special education. If SLP clinicians, researchers, and policymakers recognize the possibilities, RTI could also significantly and positively impact educational speech-language pathology.

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