Evidence-Based Practice: An Examination of Its Ramifications for the Practice of Speech-Language Pathology PurposeThe purpose of this article is to consider some of the ramifications that arise when a discipline newly endorses evidence-based practice (EBP) as a primary guiding principle. Although EBP may appear straightforward, events experienced by peer disciplines that have preceded us in the implementation of EBP raise questions about defining ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 2006
Evidence-Based Practice: An Examination of Its Ramifications for the Practice of Speech-Language Pathology
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Nan Bernstein Ratner, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, 0100 Lefrak Hall, The University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, MD 20742. E-mail: nratner@hesp.umd.edu
  • © 2006 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   October 2006
Evidence-Based Practice: An Examination of Its Ramifications for the Practice of Speech-Language Pathology
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2006, Vol. 37, 257-267. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/029)
History: Received August 17, 2005 , Accepted March 9, 2006
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2006, Vol. 37, 257-267. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/029)
History: Received August 17, 2005; Accepted March 9, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 33

PurposeThe purpose of this article is to consider some of the ramifications that arise when a discipline newly endorses evidence-based practice (EBP) as a primary guiding principle. Although EBP may appear straightforward, events experienced by peer disciplines that have preceded us in the implementation of EBP raise questions about defining acceptable forms of evidence for treatment effectiveness and efficacy, the potential roles of nonspecific or common factors, therapist quality in achieving therapy outcomes, and eventual applications of EBP that may overly confine which treatments are considered acceptable and reimbursable.

MethodThrough narrative review of the literature, the article examines valuable as well as controversial features of EBP in addition to obstacles that may impede the transition of evidence (research findings) to clinical practice.

ConclusionEBP is a valuable construct in ensuring quality of care. However, bridging between research evidence and clinical practice may require us to confront potentially difficult issues and establish thoughtful dialogue about best practices in fostering EBP itself.

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