Prologue: Combining Research and Reason To Make Treatment Decisions The seeds of this clinical forum were sown at the 2003 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Annual Convention when I went to Marc Fey and Laura Justice’s session on evidence-based practice (EBP) in the schools (Fey & Justice, 2003). After Fey discussed the different levels of research evidence, Justice talked ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 2006
Prologue: Combining Research and Reason To Make Treatment Decisions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    University of North Carolina – Greensboro
  • Contact author: Alan Kamhi, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 300 Ferguson, UNCG, Greensboro, NC 27402. E-mail: agkamhi@uncg.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / ASHA News & Member Stories / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 2006
Prologue: Combining Research and Reason To Make Treatment Decisions
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2006, Vol. 37, 255-256. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/028)
History: Received June 6, 2006 , Accepted June 8, 2006
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2006, Vol. 37, 255-256. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/028)
History: Received June 6, 2006; Accepted June 8, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7
The seeds of this clinical forum were sown at the 2003 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Annual Convention when I went to Marc Fey and Laura Justice’s session on evidence-based practice (EBP) in the schools (Fey & Justice, 2003). After Fey discussed the different levels of research evidence, Justice talked about the science and craft of making clinical decisions. She defined craft as a theoretically and goal-oriented body of knowledge that is achieved through trial and error. Vaughn and Dammann (2001)  noted that when craft is inoculated from superstition and folklore, it leads to acceptable results, and the methods developed are often useful techniques and skills. Justice went on to point out that clinicians often rely on craft when evidence is not available. At this same ASHA Convention, I presented a miniseminar entitled, “How to Decide Which Speech Treatment Approach to Use” (Kamhi, 2003). If ASHA allowed titles to exceed 10 words, the rest of the title would have been “When There Is Limited Evidence To Help You Decide.” When I got back to my office after the conference, I looked at the ASHA Web site for other presentations that dealt with EBP and found one by Nan Bernstein Ratner in which she discussed some of the same issues as they applied to fluency treatment.
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