Measurement of Intelligibility in Disordered Speech Purpose To determine empirically which of three frequently observed rules in children with phonological disorders contributes most to difficulties in speaker intelligibility. Method To evaluate the relative effects on intelligibility of deletion of final consonants (DFC), stopping of fricatives and affricates (SFA), and fronting of velars (FV), phonologically ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 2006
Measurement of Intelligibility in Disordered Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edward S. Klein
    California State University, Los Angeles
  • Cari B. Flint
    California State University, Los Angeles
  • Contact author: Edward S. Klein, Department of Communication Disorders, California State University at Los Angeles, 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90032. E-mail: eklein@cslanet.calstatela.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 2006
Measurement of Intelligibility in Disordered Speech
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2006, Vol. 37, 191-199. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/021)
History: Received December 19, 2004 , Accepted October 26, 2005
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2006, Vol. 37, 191-199. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/021)
History: Received December 19, 2004; Accepted October 26, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Purpose To determine empirically which of three frequently observed rules in children with phonological disorders contributes most to difficulties in speaker intelligibility.

Method To evaluate the relative effects on intelligibility of deletion of final consonants (DFC), stopping of fricatives and affricates (SFA), and fronting of velars (FV), phonologically reduced sentences were read to groups of adult listeners at normal levels of occurrence for typical conversation and at equal levels of occurrence.

Results DFC had a greater effect than SFA on intelligibility, which had a greater effect than FV on intelligibility, when these rules occurred at levels approximating those seen in typical conversational speech. Results differed, however, when opportunities for rule occurrence were equalized. At relatively low levels of occurrence, FV had less effect on intelligibility than did SFA and DFC, but no significant differences in intelligibility were found between the latter two rules. At relatively high levels of occurrence, no significant differences between the three rules were observed.

Implications These findings may be important clinically for clinicians who are trying to determine which rules should be targeted first in therapy.

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