Comparing Monotic and Diotic Selective Auditory Attention Abilities in Children Purpose Some researchers have assessed ear-specific performance of auditory processing ability using speech recognition tasks with normative data based on diotic administration. The present study investigated whether monotic and diotic administrations yield similar results using the Selective Auditory Attention Test. Method Seventy-two typically achieving children were tested both ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2006
Comparing Monotic and Diotic Selective Auditory Attention Abilities in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rochelle Cherry
    Brooklyn College, NY
  • Adrienne Rubinstein
    Brooklyn College, NY
  • Contact author: Adrienne Rubinstein, Department of Speech Communication Arts and Sciences, Brooklyn College, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11210. Email: arubin@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2006
Comparing Monotic and Diotic Selective Auditory Attention Abilities in Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2006, Vol. 37, 137-142. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/015)
History: Received July 15, 2004 , Revised July 25, 2005 , Accepted November 10, 2005
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2006, Vol. 37, 137-142. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2006/015)
History: Received July 15, 2004; Revised July 25, 2005; Accepted November 10, 2005

Purpose Some researchers have assessed ear-specific performance of auditory processing ability using speech recognition tasks with normative data based on diotic administration. The present study investigated whether monotic and diotic administrations yield similar results using the Selective Auditory Attention Test.

Method Seventy-two typically achieving children were tested both monotically and diotically in a counterbalanced, repeated measures design.

Results Results revealed that diotic scores were significantly higher than monotic scores, with no significant difference between right and left ears.

Conclusion Collecting ear-specific normative data is recommended over extrapolating from norms using a diotic speech recognition test. Because a binaural advantage may be found when listening under challenging conditions, the strategy of occluding one ear in children with (central) auditory processing disorder ([C]APD) should be reconsidered.

Acknowledgments
Earlier portions of this article were presented at the annual convention of the American Academy of Audiology in Salt Lake City, Utah, March 31–April 3, 2004. This study was supported by PSC-CUNY Research Grant 64688-00-33. The authors would like to acknowledge V. Katzenelson and Z. Shapiro for their assistance in data collection and M. Rosing and M. Bendavid for their assistance in the statistical treatment of the data.
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